What to visit in Cornwall? Part 1 – Padstow.

We only had two days to visit Cornwall which, as you can imagine, is very little time! Having such a limited time, we only focused on two small Cornish towns – Padstow and St. Ives. However, we also managed to take a short visit to a tiny, but picturesque, fishing village called Port Issac. I took so many photos in these three places that I have decided to split this blog post into two parts. Padstow first!

Harbour in Padstow, Cornwall
The Harbour in Padstow, Cornwall

Deliciously fresh fish, lobsters, crabs, Cornish pasties, beautiful sandy beaches and…Rick Stein’s ’empire’ are all things I will remember from our trip to Padstow. And that’s what you’re going to see in this blog post.

If you follow the South West Coast Path from the harbour, you will get to this beautiful spot…

The first thing you should do after arriving in Padstow is go to its tourist information centre. I found it very helpful as I was given a map which was circled with the best places to visit and things to do if you have only a little time. Since Padstow is famous for sandy beaches, the first thing we did was take a walk to the beach by following the South West Coast Path. Of course, I was not surprised to see beautiful scenery, but what shocked me was a graveyard of crabs scattered all over the beach. It was sad, but also quite fascinating as I had never seen crabs in the wild!

Dead crabs on the beach in Padstow

When it started to become cloudy and windy, we decided to go to the Lobster Hatchery, which is a must-visit place in Padstow. It is a charity, but also a research centre which helps to increase the falling number of European lobsters. The entrance fee is ยฃ4, but you know your money will go to a good cause. I found out many fascinating facts about these shellfish creatures, and saw the different stages of a lobster’s growth. The youngest were just three months old (the cutest things ever) and there was even one giant lobster which was about 60 years old!

Lobster's Hatchery, Padstow, Cornwall
Lobster Hatchery, Padstow, Cornwall. Captain Barnacles (that’s his name :P) weighs over 5 kg! His claws alone are around 2.5 kg!! He’s estimated to be 60 years old!!!

Another place worth paying a visit to is Padstow Museum, which is opposite the Lobster Hatchery. It’s free, but tiny, and you won’t spend more than 15 minutes there. Nevertheless, having a little read about the importance of the fishing and tourism industries for Padstow’s community was quite interesting.

Padstow Museum, Cornwall

Walking around the harbour area, you’ll definitely notice the omnipresent surname of a popular chef – Rick Stein. Padstow, apart from having plenty of local cafรฉs, is literally dominated by Stein’s businesses. Stein’s fish and chips, Stein’s deli, Stein’s seafood eatery, Stein’s hotel, Stein’s restaurant, Stein’s patisserie, Stein’s shops with nautical souvenirs, Stein’s cookery school…you name it, and Stein will give it to you.

Stein’s home accessories are beautiful.

Rumour has it that the local community does not like Rick Stein. One of the reasons is that he’s bought so many properties in Padstow, making its property market really expensive. Moreover, he does not support the Lobster Hatchery. Other small local businesses do, so why not a rich man like him?! Just saying!

There are lots of stunning beach bays around Padstow which are easily accessible by car. Make sure you visit Booby’s Bay, Constantine’s Bay and my favourite one – spots around Trevose Head. I am sure my pictures will convince you that they are all beautiful.

Bays in Padstow, Cornwall
Bays in Padstow, Cornwall
Trevose Head, Padstow, Cornwall
Trevose Head, Padstow, Cornwall
Trevose Head, Padstow, Cornwall
Among the flowers on the cliffs ๐Ÿ˜‰ Trevose Head, Cornwall – I took one billion pictures in this place
A pretty white lighthouse only adds to the beauty of this place
Mother Ivey's Bay
Mother Ivey’s Bay

Looking for a foodie’s paradise? Padstow is considered to be one! I swear to God, the sea bass I ate there was the most tender I’ve had in my entire life. The mussels in white wine were a real delicacy. If you are a seafood lover, you’ll be the happiest person on Earth in Padstow. Apart from the seafood, make sure you try traditional Cornish pasties as well as a Cornish Breakfast, which is very similar if not identical to English Breakfast.

Cornish Breakfast, Padstow, Cornwall
Cornish Breakfast, Padstow, Cornwall
Whole cooked lobsters in Rick'Stein's seafood eatery

Padstow enchanted me with its nautical atmosphere, delicious seafood, Lobster Hatchery (I didn’t know Lobsters could be such interesting creatures!), beautiful beach bays and the feeling of pride and independence you can see in its local people. The only thing I didn’t manage to visit was its famous Camel Trail, but it’s a good excuse to go back there one day. My next blog about the picturesque Cornish town of St. Ives and the fishing village of Port Issac is coming soon…

Am I flying?

Where to eat in Bournemouth: The Stable

Nowadays, it’s not enough for a restaurant just to offer tasty food. Consumers are becoming more and more conscious of where the food they eat comes from. Is it local? Is it ethically sourced? Is it organic? You can answer yes to all of these questions while eating at The Stable. I had the opportunity to find out more about the Stable’s eco values during a Bournemouth Bloggers’ event during which we learnt how to make a pizza.

Nibbles – a selection of light refreshments to start the evening.

When we arrived, we were welcomed with nibbles such as slices of chorizo, olives, pepper paste, crispy bread and local cheese. Due to the fact that The Stable is known for having a variety of ciders, I decided to spend the evening with an accompaniment of this alcoholic apple drink. The bartender was very helpful and advised which cider would suit my taste buds – I don’t like it when it’s too sweet!

The main attraction of the evening was a presentation on how to make a soft dough and tasty tomato sauce by two charismatic chefs. I hope they don’t mind me sharing this secret with you! The secret of making a fantastic-tasting tomato sauce lies in frying red onions, which are sweeter than white onions, to balance the acidity of canned tomatoes. Do not add garlic to the sauce too quickly because it will burn!

@chefcambell and his assistant

When it comes to the dough, adding the right amount of water and yeast is key. If you add too much water, the dough will be too crispy! The Stable chefs said it was a matter of experimenting to find the recipe for success. It’s also worth mentioning that the flour that is used in The Stable to make pizza is 100% organic!

All of the Bournemouth Bloggers were given the opportunity to create our own pizza. We were given different ingredients and even though I felt like putting all of them on my pizza, I knew that the Italians believe minimalism is the key to success when it comes to pizza! I decided to go for mozzarella, chorizo, red onions and some basil leaves. Well, I still managed to overdo it and included too much cheese, so it came out too cheesy and heavy! But hey, who has ever complained about too much cheese?!

The event organised at The Stable was very informative and fun at the same time. It’s highly important to me to get to know restaurants’ values before I decide to eat there. In the end, we are consumers, and we have the power to create demand. I choose places which not only care about their customers eating good food and having a good time, but are also mindful about the planet. The Stable is a perfect eco-friendly place for a catch up with friends while having simple but tasty food like pizza and pies, plus local cider.

Always a good catch up with Francesca – one of the Bournemouth Bloggers

A walk along the Jurassic Coast. Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door.

This is one of my favourite places to go at weekends. It’s simply fantastic. Both Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door are part of a long coastline called the Jurassic Coast. The structure of its cliffs, rocks and fossils can tell you the story of Earth across 185 million years! We had a fabulous time there, climbed a couple of cliffs (losing our breath a couple of times in the process), took loads of stunning pics, and rewarded ourselves with some comforting food in one of the restaurants.

Just admiring the beautiful landscapes of the Jurassic Coast is a pleasant and unforgettable experience, but when you realise that you’re standing on cliffs that have taken millions of years to be formed, it simply takes your breath away.

I bet the first association people have with the name Jurassic Coast is Jurassic Park. Yes, dinosaurs! They used to walk on these lands and you can still find plenty of their fossils lying on the beach, and for me, the thought of it makes the walk even more thrilling.

Lulworth Cove

We started our walk from Lulworth Cove, which came into being because of a collision of continents, and continued towards Durdle Door. It is an iconic arch of limestone standing in the sea, making it a perfect spot for photos.

As you can see it can be quite windy out there…

In my opinion, Durdle Door should actually be named Durdle Window since you can see beautiful turquoise water through it. It is like the Azure Window in Malta, which collapsed two years ago and left everyone heartbroken! Durdle Door is for English people what the Azure Window is for the Maltese – simply iconic. Can you imagine if Durdle Door collapsed into the sea? I can’t. The landscape of the Jurassic Coast would not be the same!

It would not be the same photo if Durdle Door was not the backdrop!

The beauty of this place is undeniable, but it can be dangerous if you’re not careful. There are high cliffs, strong winds and the tempting urge to get closer to the the edge to take a perfect selfie. Not advisable unless you want to feel like a god…

Or the statue of Jesus in Rio de Janerio…
It can be melancholic sometimes…
Climbing up and down the Jurassic Coast cliffs is exhausting. Lying on the soft grass can be a remedy…
A dramatic sky and sunshine are what every photographer dreams of. Don’t you think the grass looks like a beautiful green carpet or a football pitch?
We met some dalmatians lying on the grass ๐Ÿ˜€

I know I have been complaining a lot about the exhausting walk up and down the Jurassic Coast hills, but believe me it’s worth it. Especially when you can reward yourself with some comforting food at one of the restaurants in Lulworth Cove. We chose the Lulworth Cove Inn – a cosy English pub selling fresh, local and sustainably sourced produce.

I truly recommend eating there…
Seafood platter (crab paste, fried whitebait, squid, and prawn cocktail)

But if you decide to eat outside, be careful of voracious vultures….

Visiting the Jurassic Coast is a must if you live in or come to visit Bournemouth. It’s only a 45 minute drive by car and there are some travel agencies like Discover Dorset that can take you there as well. You can do a challenging walk and climb a couple of cliffs, but if you don’t want to get too tired, choose an easy walk from Lulworth Cove to Durdle Door! I hope this blog post and my photos have encouraged you to go there!

Crafts and Giggles

As children, we have many opportunities to do crafts. But our fast-paced adult lives make it almost impossible to find a moment to focus on some more creative activities. I have always liked crafts, so when I got an invitation from Bournemouth Bloggers to attend a flower crown making event by Crafts and Giggles, I immediately said yes.

Crafts and Giggles is an independent company run by the adorable and talented Katie, who offers different kinds of craft workshops – you can see the selection of workshops here. She studied Art at Bournemouth University and is now providing her services at hen parties, birthdays, children’s parties and even corporate events. She mainly works in Dorset, but she also gets invited to other parts of England.

Katie in her workshop in Poole

Katie, who is also a blogger, taught us how to make flower crowns by using silk flowers, metal wires and self adhesive tape. Not only was it a creative activity, but also a mindful session which helped us to concentrate. In the era of the internet and being bombarded by too much information, being able to focus on one thing is priceless and necessary.

I chose white and pink flowers for my crown from tons of other colours provided by Katie. You can see some other colourful crowns created by Bournemouth Bloggers below.
As you can see, we enjoyed crown making a lot. Don’t we all look like mysterious nymphs? ๐Ÿ˜€ Emma, Maria, Lauren, me, Emma, Alice and Ciara (if you click on their names, you’ll be redirected to their fantastic blogs).
A ray of sunshine passing through a window in Katie’s office in Poole.
With Lauren from
http://www.laurenlovesblog.co.uk/

I would really recommend Crafts and Giggles to everyone who wants to have some fun while doing meaningful and creative activities. Even though we are Bournemouth Bloggers and usually use our phones all the time during events, this time we put down our phones for over one hour and immersed ourselves in the activity of flower crown making. I can only reassure you that your children will love it and so will adults.

A glamorous photo of Bournemouth bloggers in their flower crowns on the stairs.

Romanzo. A family-run Greek restaurant in Bournemouth

‘Kalispera!’ means ‘good evening’ in Greek, and what a great and delicious evening we had with our friends at Romanzo last month. It is a genuine, independent place, awarded with a certificate of excellence from TripAdvisor. It’s been run by a very hospitable family from Cyprus since 1986 and, believe me, they will make you feel as if they are welcoming you in their own home. It’s located in Westbourne (address here) and you’d better reserve your table in advance, as they are always packed!

Cosy light and homely decorations are very inviting…

Romanzo is a cosy and fairly small restaurant where the tables are placed very close to each other. While some may think that sitting so close to other people is an attack on privacy, I personally love it, because it feels as if you are part of a big family attending a Greek feast. And don’t worry, other people’s conversations are gently muted by Greek music.

What deserves mentioning is Romanzo’s attention to detail and its decorations. Greek music and tablecloths patterned in white and blue squares will transfer you to a Greek Taverna. The menu’s picture, presenting the elderly man looking down nostalgically alongside two donkeys, is so original and captivating. Once we opened the menu, it was difficult to make a choice as all the descriptions of the dishes looked so appealing and appetizing. Here’s what we eventually decided to order.

Happy people who can’t wait to start eating…
One of the starters, Calamari Fritti (fried Calamari), with some fresh salad and yoghurt. Refreshing and crispy.
We were gifted a big plate of fried potatoes. Who would say no to some extra fried potatoes?
I probably don’t have to introduce this Greek classic, called Moussaka, which consists of layers of potatoes, minced meat and aubergine topped with cheese. My friend ordered Moussaka and I was truly envious, despite my dish being delicious as well.
Souvlaki – which is simply a skewer of meat (pork, chicken or lamb) with rice, salad and tzatziki.
Roast dinner? No, it’s Arni Tava, which is a knuckle of lamb slow cooked in the oven with tomatoes, onions and cumin.
I ordered a seafood platter with grilled sardines, prawns and calamari. It tasted delightful and refreshing, especially with a splash of lemon.
Afelia pork fillet cooked with mushrooms in wine and coriander seeds, served with rice & Greek salad. The price of starters is approximately 5 pounds and main dishes are between 12 and 15 pounds.
A good dinner accompanied by wine must be followed by a decadent dessert, and as you can see on the board there’s plenty to choose from.
Mama’s orange, caramel and banana dessert. Delightful sweetness!
Homemade cheesecake. I know it’s not very Greek, but who doesn’t like cheesecake?

We fell in love with Greek food while travelling in Crete last year. Eating at Romanza reminded us of this fantastic sunny time in Crete and all the culinary pleasures we experienced there. Highly recommended!

A photo of me at Chania’s harbour in Crete. If only the weather in Bournemouth was the same.

A walk from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage beach and back

English weather is known for being moody and changeable. Going for a walk when it’s grey and cloudy can make you feel nostalgic or melancholic, but not when you’re walking with your friends. Even on a cloudy day, walking from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage Beach and back can be an exciting and pleasant stroll. Admiring beautiful scenery from the cliffs, eating Cornish pasties during a break in Swanage and finishing a 13 km (8 mile) walk with some comforting food at a cosy pub sounds like a good plan for a Saturday afternoon, doesn’t it?


We drove from Bournemouth to Studland and parked our car next to the Bankes Arms pub. You can get there by ferry from Sandbanks or via Wareham, which seems like a longer drive but it actually takes the same time (approximately 50 minutes) and it does not include the time waiting for a ferry.

The breathtaking rocks are part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site and managed by the National Trust.
‘The chalk formations are popularly know as Old Harry Rocks, but the name actually refers to the single stack of chalk standing furthest out to sea. Until 1896 there was another stack known as Old Harryโ€™s Wife, but erosion caused her to tumble into the sea, leaving just a stump.’ Source: visit-dorset.com

Poor Harry has been widowed for over 100 years!

Coming close to the edge to take a picture is both scary and thrilling. You won’t see the beautiful view if you don’t get closer, but I think it’s better to crawl. There have been incidents of people and dogs falling from the cliffs – some of them miraculously survived. You can read some articles about it here and here.

This is how walking on the cliffs makes you feel ๐Ÿ˜‰
A view over the Swanage beach and some beautiful yellow flowers called gorse.
Swanage beach is different to Bournemouth beach. It has a wilder character, is less touristic, and is beautifully peaceful and quiet. It has won many Blue Flag Awards.
Beach huts are one of my favs to photograph. They are colourful and reflect an English seasidey atmosphere. Which of the outfits these ladies are wearing do you prefer?
Seeing colourful huts on a cloudy day was like a breath of fresh air and brightened up our walk. These colours are so typically marine!
My friend noticed the reflection of red beach huts in the water so we had to capture it on camera.
I can’t help myself but to take photos of dogs running happily on the beach. I always ask their owners if I can which is a bit embarrassing! This is Josh – wet but pleased with a beach run – who proudly posed in front of my camera.
Red seaweed?
After the walk from Old Harry Rocks, we stopped to recharge our batteries and ate traditional Cornish pasties, and drank some tea and coffee.
Traditional Cornish Pasties with beef, swede, potatoes and onions gave us energy to climb the hill leading to Old Harry Rocks.
Fruit scones. This time we just admired them through the window display.

Our way back to Old Harry Rocks. It was obviously much harder to climb the hill than walking down to Swanage, but believe me, the feeling of satisfaction after a climb is worth the effort. I took this picture of my walking team when I was left far behind. Ah well, it was my fault as I took pictures of everything I encountered – the tough life of a blogger!

The climb from Swanage beach back to Old Harry Rocks was rewarding but quite challenging and it left me in pain for all of Sunday and Monday! It was windy, foggy and it was slowly becoming darker, but I loved it.

We made a friend – a black raven which we fed with some pasty. We named him Harry.

At 7 o’ clock in the evening, Old Harry Rocks were covered in a mysterious mist and you could hardly see a living soul. Legend says that the Rock was named Harry after a devil with the same name slept on it.

At this point we had almost reached the Bankes Arms where we started our journey. I looked up and saw how creepy this tree looked. We also heard an owl in the background. I did not want to be part of a horror story or have a close encounter with Harry the Devil, so I was extremely happy to be approaching the pub and was looking forward to some comfort food.

Walking 13 kilometres feels like a good excuse to eat whatever you want and however much you want! The Bankes Arms Inn welcomed us with very tasty food and generous portions of my favourite classsic fish & chips, hot dog with chorizo and a game casserole with pheasant, rabbit and venison.

A walk from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage and back was a great adventure and I would definitely recommend it if you would like to make some more physical effort and challenge yourself. So what are your favourite places to take more demanding walks?

A very green post.

If I were forced to choose only one colour of clothes to wear for the rest of my life it would probably be green – in particular khaki. I think it’s elegant and it also intensifies the colour of my eyes. I probably have too many khaki clothes! Green is obviously the predominant colour of nature, and while looking through the pictures of Bournemouth and the surrounding area I have taken over the last 3 months, I noticed that I’d captured beautiful shades of my favourite khaki on stones, pine trees, boats and others. In this blog post you’ll see those photos containing shades of green and read about the symbolism of this colour.

Seaweed covering big stones. Mudeford in Christchurch.

I know it’s a sweeping generalisation to say that certain colours evoke characteristic emotions in people, but according to the psychology of colours, our favourite shades may say a lot about our personalities. (Check your favourite colour here).

Mudeford in Christchurch. Swans and the edge of the water covered in seaweed
Pine trees in Poole.

The colours we choose for our bedrooms and living rooms can significantly influence our mood. Colours are also extremely important in marketing campaigns (see here). Green evokes a feeling of health, peace, calm and stability. Marketers use green in branding to emphasize that they are trustworthy and reliable.

Stones covered in seaweed at Sandbanks are a beautiful backdrop for photos. Green is the colour of stability and safety. I can describe myself as someone who does not like changes and is not so keen on getting out of her comfort zone. Is that why I love green so much?
The sunset hiding behind monstrous green stones. Mudeford, Christchurch.
Green juice at Wagamama. Mine was made from kale, apple and celery – which is considered to be a super food due to its healthy properties.
Seaweed covering an abandoned boat in Poole Harbour.
A pine tree and a cloudless blue sky. Poole.
Green is also the symbol of money, greed, ambition and jealousy. I tend to be overambitious and competitive, and my perfectionism drives me crazy. I also admit to being jealous at times (my look in this picture says it all)…but I prefer to say I am ‘passionate’ ๐Ÿ˜‰
A view from our living room. I consider myself lucky to be waking up to this view of green pine trees and Meyrick Park.
Finally, a picture of the book Live Green by Jen Chillingsworth, which changed my everyday life and nasty habits into better, more environmentally friendly ones. It shows easy ways of living ‘green’ and feeling good about your everyday choices, from shopping to cleaning. My blog post about buying local and loose produce in Bournemouth greengrocers was written after reading this book. You can find it here.

If you were to choose only one colour, what would it be? Does the symbolism of your favourite colour match with your personality traits?