A walk along the Jurassic Coast. Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door.

This is one of my favourite places to go at weekends. It’s simply fantastic. Both Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door are part of a long coastline called the Jurassic Coast. The structure of its cliffs, rocks and fossils can tell you the story of Earth across 185 million years! We had a fabulous time there, climbed a couple of cliffs (losing our breath a couple of times in the process), took loads of stunning pics, and rewarded ourselves with some comforting food in one of the restaurants.

Just admiring the beautiful landscapes of the Jurassic Coast is a pleasant and unforgettable experience, but when you realise that you’re standing on cliffs that have taken millions of years to be formed, it simply takes your breath away.

I bet the first association people have with the name Jurassic Coast is Jurassic Park. Yes, dinosaurs! They used to walk on these lands and you can still find plenty of their fossils lying on the beach, and for me, the thought of it makes the walk even more thrilling.

Lulworth Cove

We started our walk from Lulworth Cove, which came into being because of a collision of continents, and continued towards Durdle Door. It is an iconic arch of limestone standing in the sea, making it a perfect spot for photos.

As you can see it can be quite windy out there…

In my opinion, Durdle Door should actually be named Durdle Window since you can see beautiful turquoise water through it. It is like the Azure Window in Malta, which collapsed two years ago and left everyone heartbroken! Durdle Door is for English people what the Azure Window is for the Maltese – simply iconic. Can you imagine if Durdle Door collapsed into the sea? I can’t. The landscape of the Jurassic Coast would not be the same!

It would not be the same photo if Durdle Door was not the backdrop!

The beauty of this place is undeniable, but it can be dangerous if you’re not careful. There are high cliffs, strong winds and the tempting urge to get closer to the the edge to take a perfect selfie. Not advisable unless you want to feel like a god…

Or the statue of Jesus in Rio de Janerio…
It can be melancholic sometimes…
Climbing up and down the Jurassic Coast cliffs is exhausting. Lying on the soft grass can be a remedy…
A dramatic sky and sunshine are what every photographer dreams of. Don’t you think the grass looks like a beautiful green carpet or a football pitch?
We met some dalmatians lying on the grass πŸ˜€

I know I have been complaining a lot about the exhausting walk up and down the Jurassic Coast hills, but believe me it’s worth it. Especially when you can reward yourself with some comforting food at one of the restaurants in Lulworth Cove. We chose the Lulworth Cove Inn – a cosy English pub selling fresh, local and sustainably sourced produce.

I truly recommend eating there…
Seafood platter (crab paste, fried whitebait, squid, and prawn cocktail)

But if you decide to eat outside, be careful of voracious vultures….

Visiting the Jurassic Coast is a must if you live in or come to visit Bournemouth. It’s only a 45 minute drive by car and there are some travel agencies like Discover Dorset that can take you there as well. You can do a challenging walk and climb a couple of cliffs, but if you don’t want to get too tired, choose an easy walk from Lulworth Cove to Durdle Door! I hope this blog post and my photos have encouraged you to go there!

A walk from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage beach and back

English weather is known for being moody and changeable. Going for a walk when it’s grey and cloudy can make you feel nostalgic or melancholic, but not when you’re walking with your friends. Even on a cloudy day, walking from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage Beach and back can be an exciting and pleasant stroll. Admiring beautiful scenery from the cliffs, eating Cornish pasties during a break in Swanage and finishing a 13 km (8 mile) walk with some comforting food at a cosy pub sounds like a good plan for a Saturday afternoon, doesn’t it?


We drove from Bournemouth to Studland and parked our car next to the Bankes Arms pub. You can get there by ferry from Sandbanks or via Wareham, which seems like a longer drive but it actually takes the same time (approximately 50 minutes) and it does not include the time waiting for a ferry.

The breathtaking rocks are part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site and managed by the National Trust.
‘The chalk formations are popularly know as Old Harry Rocks, but the name actually refers to the single stack of chalk standing furthest out to sea. Until 1896 there was another stack known as Old Harry’s Wife, but erosion caused her to tumble into the sea, leaving just a stump.’ Source: visit-dorset.com

Poor Harry has been widowed for over 100 years!

Coming close to the edge to take a picture is both scary and thrilling. You won’t see the beautiful view if you don’t get closer, but I think it’s better to crawl. There have been incidents of people and dogs falling from the cliffs – some of them miraculously survived. You can read some articles about it here and here.

This is how walking on the cliffs makes you feel πŸ˜‰
A view over the Swanage beach and some beautiful yellow flowers called gorse.
Swanage beach is different to Bournemouth beach. It has a wilder character, is less touristic, and is beautifully peaceful and quiet. It has won many Blue Flag Awards.
Beach huts are one of my favs to photograph. They are colourful and reflect an English seasidey atmosphere. Which of the outfits these ladies are wearing do you prefer?
Seeing colourful huts on a cloudy day was like a breath of fresh air and brightened up our walk. These colours are so typically marine!
My friend noticed the reflection of red beach huts in the water so we had to capture it on camera.
I can’t help myself but to take photos of dogs running happily on the beach. I always ask their owners if I can which is a bit embarrassing! This is Josh – wet but pleased with a beach run – who proudly posed in front of my camera.
Red seaweed?
After the walk from Old Harry Rocks, we stopped to recharge our batteries and ate traditional Cornish pasties, and drank some tea and coffee.
Traditional Cornish Pasties with beef, swede, potatoes and onions gave us energy to climb the hill leading to Old Harry Rocks.
Fruit scones. This time we just admired them through the window display.

Our way back to Old Harry Rocks. It was obviously much harder to climb the hill than walking down to Swanage, but believe me, the feeling of satisfaction after a climb is worth the effort. I took this picture of my walking team when I was left far behind. Ah well, it was my fault as I took pictures of everything I encountered – the tough life of a blogger!

The climb from Swanage beach back to Old Harry Rocks was rewarding but quite challenging and it left me in pain for all of Sunday and Monday! It was windy, foggy and it was slowly becoming darker, but I loved it.

We made a friend – a black raven which we fed with some pasty. We named him Harry.

At 7 o’ clock in the evening, Old Harry Rocks were covered in a mysterious mist and you could hardly see a living soul. Legend says that the Rock was named Harry after a devil with the same name slept on it.

At this point we had almost reached the Bankes Arms where we started our journey. I looked up and saw how creepy this tree looked. We also heard an owl in the background. I did not want to be part of a horror story or have a close encounter with Harry the Devil, so I was extremely happy to be approaching the pub and was looking forward to some comfort food.

Walking 13 kilometres feels like a good excuse to eat whatever you want and however much you want! The Bankes Arms Inn welcomed us with very tasty food and generous portions of my favourite classsic fish & chips, hot dog with chorizo and a game casserole with pheasant, rabbit and venison.

A walk from Old Harry Rocks to Swanage and back was a great adventure and I would definitely recommend it if you would like to make some more physical effort and challenge yourself. So what are your favourite places to take more demanding walks?

Winchester Christmas Market

I have always said that Bournemouth is in a perfect location because it’s not far away from famous cities and tourist attractions. Winchester is one of them. It’s the former capital city of England and is located only 40 miles (approx. 64 km) away from Bournemouth. It’s famous for Winchester Cathedral (the longest Gothic Cathedral in Europe), the legendary Round Table of King Arthur, and the city’s beautiful Gothic architecture. During the winter period, it’s also famous for its Christmas Market, which is located around the charming Cathedral. Here is my photo collection from a Sunday visit to the market. I am sorry to disappoint all crafts lovers, but the photos are mainly related to food. I can’t help it, I’m a foodie and food stalls interest me the most!

Christmas decorations with Winchester Cathedral in the background
The Market is very busy at weekends. Be prepared to walk like a penguin, but don’t give up – it’s still worth going there!
A big pot of aromatic mulled wine
Italian chestnuts.
This bag cost me 3 pounds. Even though the chestnuts were a bit hard, I enjoyed them. They’re not easily available outside of the Christmas period so it’s good to eat them now!
Authentic crepes were sold by two French ladies. I chose a classic one with lemon juice and sugar. Delicious in its simplicity.
I love taking photos of food menus on a black chalkboard. It always looks amazing.
The High Street in the centre of Winchester. Not sure how to feel about this cute dog being used by the lady as a Christmas decoration…I found out that some people reported it to RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals). Hopefully, it’s nothing to be worried about.
Street artist
 I’m glad we stayed in Winchester until it got dark. The Christmas lights added to the Christmassy atmosphere.

I would love to know what your favourite food stall is at Christmas Markets πŸ™‚ 

New Forest – Burley

Believe it or not, there’s a magical woodland containing unicorns only around 18 miles away from Bournemouth. It’s called the New Forest.

Contrary to what the name suggests, the New Forest is anything but new. It’s actually an ancient woodland which will stun you with its beautiful landscapes and wild animals like horses, deer and pigs. It became a National Park in 2005 and is an absolute “must go”!

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The name was given to the Forest by William the Conqueror, who in the 11th century proclaimed it a royal forest and his new hunting area. He would hunt in the woods for deer and wild boar with his guests and held big feasts afterwards. I wish I could take part in one of those feasts (no offence to vegetarians and hunting opponents, of course!). An interesting fact is that William’s son was shot by an arrow while hunting and it has never been explained if it was an accident or not.

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The New Forest contains many villages. I often visit one called Burley, where you can encounter wild ponies, typical cottages, cosy restaurants…and even some witches…

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In the 1950s, a woman called Sybil Leek used to live in Burley, but the poor thing had to move to America because her interest in astrology, occultism and a long black cloak made the locals think she was a witch! Nevertheless, Sybil’s presence and legacy are still noticeable. Burley’s shops offer souvenirs related to witchcraft including magical amulets, wolves, witches on brooms, unicorns (I told you!) and fairies.

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One of the biggest attractions of the New Forest is its wild horses. There are around 5,000 of them in the Forest and they wander around lazily. Their presence in the New Forest is estimated to date back around 2,000 years! Thanks to these grass eaters, the fields of the New Forest are always clean.

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The New Forest ponies walk graciously and they look very friendly, but they can actually kick and bite. I witnessed this myself when one lady, misled by its apparently gentle nature, approached a pony from behind. Nothing serious happened to her…well, apart from landing on the ground with a thud and an expression of embarrassment across her face! But it was a great reminder that we should respect the ponies’ wildness.

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The other heroes of the New Forest are pigs. Their function is very important because apart from looking cute, they eat nuts some of which are poisonous to the horses.

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So if you want to walk on the lands where William the Conqueror used to hunt, eat a nice dinner in a homely restaurant and have a wander in the forest to see white stallions walking beside you – the choice is simple.

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